Tag Archives: LJ

LJ’s eBook Summit – September 29th

Mark your calendars for September 29th, the LJ/SLJ eBook Summit – eBooks: Libraries at the Tipping Point.  This looks like it will be a fabulous event with great keynote speakers lined up and a diverse selection of panel discussions.  Ray Kurzweill, Kevin Kelly, and David Lankes are featured keynote speakers.  The breakout sessions will feature program tracks for school, public, and academic libraries.  The program is available online, and early bird registration for the VERY LOW price of $19.95 (librarians and students) ends on July 30th.   I’m sure this great price is thanks to the sponsors – OverDrive, Baker and Taylor, Capstone Digital, and Gale/Cengage.

Congrats LJ – this is a wonderful idea and I can’t wait to attend.

Independent Reference Publishers Group (IRPG) Meeting Summary – ALA Conference

Each Friday before the ALA Conference, the Independent Reference Publishers Group (IRPG) gets together to have a program and discussion of issues surrounding reference publishing.  The ALA Annual meeting was no exception.  A large group of publishers and librarians gathered to figure out, “how did we get here?”  A panel of librarians, LIS instructors, reference contributors, and wholesalers, organized by Peter Tobey at Salem Press, presented some thoughts and challenges for reference content and reference publishing.  A summary of these comments is below.  The panelists included:  Buffy Hamilton, a teacher/librarian from Creekview H.S. in Canton, GA and blogger at The Unquiet Librarian and 1/4 blogger for Libraries and Transliteracy;  Sue Polanka (me);  Dave Tyckoson, Associate Dean of the Madden Library, CSU – Fresno;  Bernadette Low, a frequent contributor to reference content from the Community College of Baltimore City;  William Taylor, Manager, Continuations iSelect (R) and Standing Orders at Ingram Content Group;  and Jessica Moyer, a doctoral candidate in literacy education at the U of Minnesota and instructor of a MLIS reference course. Continue reading

Open Letter to E-Book Creators and Sellers from Library Customers

Reposting this open letter from an LJ article, thanks to @mlharper for the tweet.

An Open Letter to E-Book Creators and Sellers from Library Customers

Libraries and their customers have a long and mutually beneficial relationship with authors, publishers, and vendors, based on the printed word – books. Now, with the emergence of popular e-books and e-book readers, libraries are positioned to continue that partnership with these exciting new products.
Libraries have much to offer e-book sellers as you work to establish a new successful business model around the e-book format. At the same time libraries need e-book providers to offer e-pub materials in ways that enable and support use by libraries and library users. Here is the deal. Continue reading

Reference: The Missing Link in Discovery – Q/A from Webinar

Last week LJ and Credo Reference sponsored the webinar, Reference: The Missing Link in Discovery.  I had the pleasure of presenting at the webinar with Joe Janes from the University of Washington.  The archive of the webinar is available on the LJ site.

Several questions were asked by participants which Joe and I could not answer live.  Those questions, and answers, are below.  We welcome your comments and further discussion on the future of reference. Continue reading

Reference: The Missing Link in Discovery – webinar summary

Today, Joe Janes from Univ. of Washington, Mike Sweet from Credo, and myself had a great conversation on reference content, student research habits, and how reference content can be more discoverable during the LJ webinar “Reference: The Missing Link in Discovery.”

Joe highlighted research results from OCLC Perceptions study and 2 studies at the University of Washington – Project Information Literacy and use of Wikipedia for course-related research which focused on the changing research behaviors of students.  He also addressed the teaching of reference sources to librarians, comparing his learning of sources years ago to today’s focus on content over containers.  He speculated on various reference sources that have gone away, transitioned, and what still persists. Continue reading

LJ Webinar – Reference: The Missing Link in Discovery

WEBCAST NAME:Reference: The Missing Link in Discovery
SPONSORED BY: Credo Reference and Library Journal
EVENT DATE: Tuesday, May 11, 2010 – 2:00 PM EDT Time – 60 minutes

Register Online – It’s FREE Continue reading

BYU Using the Kindle for ILL

Hotdog, someone has started a much needed plan to get eBooks part of the ILL program.  According to a 6/10/09 LJ article, BYU Library has a pilot program wth 3 Kindles.  They are  circulating these kindles with a variety of very new titles, too new for ILL.  Verbal permission was given from Amazon, nothing in writing.  Highly recommended to speak with Amazon before you delve into loaning out Kindles.  Check out the article for more details.

E-Reference Ratings from LJ

LJ just released E-Reference Ratings, “an evaluation of nearly 180 subscription based electronic resources in 14 subject categories.”  Of course, many of these are eBook platforms like Britannica, Credo, GVRL, Oxford, and Sage.   There was no category for eBooks, instead you’ll find them listed under the various subject categories.

Products were reviewed by a team of 8 reference experts and included 7 criteria:  scope, writing, design, linking, bells & whistles, ease of use, value.  Resources were given a star rating, 1 to 4 stars to indicate * poor, ** satisfactory, ***good, ****excellent  A brief paragraph also accompanied each resource.

According to LJ, “Because we know that online resources continually grow and evolve—a list of this nature can date quickly—E-Reference Ratings, which made a print debut in the November 15th Reference Announcements issue, will find its permanent home and reach its full potential on our web site. We intend not only to keep up with these ever-changing products (adjusting the ratings as necessary) but also to expand the number of databases in each category and venture into new ones. We hope to hear from all parties—librarians, publishers, and vendors—about how we can keep this tool thriving and make it even more useful.”

Congrats LJ!  This was no small feat.�