Tag Archives: LOCKSS

Open Access eBooks, part 4, by Eric Hellman

From Eric Hellman’s blog, Go To Hellman – The fourth section my book chapter on Open Access eBooks looks at theier relationship with libraries.  I previously posted the IntroductionWhat does Open Access mean for eBooks and Business Models for Creation of Open Access E-Books. I’ll be posting one more section, a conclusion.

Thank you for all of your comments; the completed chapter (and OA eBook) will be better for them.

Libraries and Open Access E-Books
One of the missions of libraries is to provide access to all sorts of information, including e-books. If an e-book is already open access, what role is left for libraries play?

Here’s a thought-experiment for libraries: imagine that the library’s entire collection is digital. Should it include Shakespeare? Should it include Moby Dick? These are available as public domain works from Project Gutenberg; providing these editions in a library collection might seem to be superfluous. Many librarians have been trying to convince their patrons that “free stuff on the Internet” is often inferior to the quality information available through libraries. There are certainly e-book editions of these works available for purchase with better illustrations, better editing, annotations, etc. Should libraries try to steer patrons to these resources instead of using the free stuff? Continue reading

Charleston Conference – eBook Archiving

Yesterday, I joined a panel of publishers, aggregators, and archiving agencies to discuss the issue of eBook archiving.  I had to set the stage for libraries, which was quite easy – we are in fear of losing our content to which we no longer have control of since it is housed on someone else’s server in another part of the country/world.  How do we guarantee that the content we purchased will remain accessible to us and our end users? We need to work on a solution….and fast.

Rebecca Seger from Oxford University Press presented the publishers perspective, highlighting things OUP has done, and challenges facing publishers.

  • OUP has journals archiving in place with portico, CLOCKSS, and LOCKSS.  OUP’s first trigger event happened in 2009.  Their policy is publicly available on the OUP site.
  • Ebook archiving at OUP is done via publisher archiving and a dark archive.  They keep a repository in PDF format.  But, OUP cannot archive the proprietary versions created by the aggregator partners like ebrary, EBL, Ingram, EBSCO.
  • OUP feels the obligation to preserve the Oxford Scholarship Online version for library customers.  They also offer the option of providing XML data to purchaser for local archiving (as she described was being done at OhioLINK.)
  • Some challenges:  Archiving options are limited for ebooks as not everything available for journals is available for ebooks, yet.  Additionally, defining the trigger events has proven to be much more difficult. Continue reading

Archiving eBooks, librarians are you concerned?

What if your eBook aggregator or perhaps the publisher with whom you now own over 5,000 eBook titles went belly up next week?  What if OCLC and EBSCO never purchased NetLibrary, where would your titles have gone?  Perhaps the 100 titles you’ve bought for your personal Kindle are no good when the device disappears due to newer technology. Are you concerned about accessing the eBook content you’ve purchased in perpetuity?  Is the lack of eBook archiving preventing you from purchasing eBooks? Are Portico, LOCKSS, or CLOCKS suitable solutions for archiving eBooks?  I’m looking for your opinions and concerns on eBook archiving for a Charleston Conference presentation on this very topic.  Please leave your comments or send me a direct email at sue.polanka at wright.edu

Thanks!

New Book About eBooks in Libraries – Release in August

I’m thrilled to inform you that No Shelf Required: E-books in Libraries will be released in late August.  This edited book, published by ALA Editions, discusses a variety of eBook topics for school, public, and academic libraries.  Since I have a bit of clout with the publisher, I’m able to release the TOC and introduction for your review and consideration.  It is below.  Of course, it will be available in a variety of eBook formats, and print too. Continue reading

New Audio Interview with Heather Staines from Springer

Heather Staines, Global eProduct Manager for SpringerLink, Springer Science + Business Media, and I had a nice conversation about Springer’s eBook preservation strategy.  The conversation was based on Heather’s article in Against the Grain, February 2009.  Heather discusses Portico, LOCKSS, and general eBook preservation issues.   Listen to Heather’s interview and many others through the NSR interviews page.