Tag Archives: no shelf required

A Guide to Ebook Purchasing – American Libraries

Check out the latest article in American Libraries Magazine (Dispatches from the Field column) about eBook purchasing.  It is a condensed version of a larger piece that will appear in Library Technology Reports Nov/Dec issue, which should be available very soon. Topics include: print to digital, business models, publishers/aggregators/wholesalers, buying through consortia, and evaluating vendors.

Here is the first paragraph and citation info:
A Guide to Ebook Purchasing
By Sue Polanka
Tue, 11/15/2011 – 08:12
American Libraries Magazine

Advice from the author of No Shelf Required on how to flex your library’s purchasing muscle

For those libraries looking to purchase e-books, you are not alone. According to the Library Journal 2011 survey of ebook penetration and use in libraries, 95% of academic, 82% of public, and 44% of school libraries are already offering ebooks, and many more are considering it. For anyone contemplating purchasing ebooks, asking why is the most important question. What are the primary goals of purchasing ebooks in your library or your consortium? Is it to expand the collection or to increase the buying power of a group of libraries? Is it to replace existing print collections, offer new services, or experiment with new business models in the hope of saving money? Whatever the reason, it is imperative to keep one’s goals in mind throughout the process. Buying ebooks is a complicated process. To do it effectively is an even greater challenge due to the many ways to procure ebooks.

ALA TechSource webinar series – Integrating E-Books and E-Readers into Your Library

ALA TechSource has just opened registration for the upcoming webinar series on e-books and e-readers.  I hope you can join us.

Integrating E-Books and E-Readers into Your Library
with Sue Polanka

Two 90-minute sessions
Thursdays 8/4/11 and 8/11/11
2:30 – 4:00 PM EDT | 1:30 – 3:00 PM CDT
12:30 – 2:00 PM MDT | 11:30 AM – 1:00 PM PDT

With the exploding popularity of e-books and e-reading devices, librarians are grappling with how to effectively integrate them into their services and collections. Sue Polanka is back by popular demand to present this two-session ALA TechSource workshop on how to go about it. With her practical guidance you will learn how to begin purchasing and lending e-books for your library, and how to purchase e-reading devices for patron use. Continue reading

2011 Salem Press Library Blog Awards – Vote Now

Salem Press has once again surveyed the library blog landscape in search of exceptional thinking, writing and information. After sifting through hundreds of nominations, our blog judges have spoken and their votes have been tallied. Forty outstanding blogs, five in each category, came out on top. We now need your help to narrow down the list of finalists.

To vote for your favorite blogs, click Blog Awards. And thanks for participating. Continue reading

Open Access eBooks, Part 3

From Eric Hellman’s Go To Hellman blog.  Please offer your comments to Eric at the Go To Hellman blog.

Here’s the third section of my draft of a book chapter for a book edited by No Shelf Required‘s Sue Polanka. I previously posted the introduction; and What does Open Access mean for eBooks subsequent posts will cover Open Access E-Books in Libraries. Note that while the blog always uses “ebook” as one word, the book will use the hyphenated form, “e-book”. The comments on the second section prompted me to make significant revisions, which I have posted.

Business Models for Creation of Open Access E-Books
Any model for e-book publishing must have a business model for recouping the expenses of production: reviewing, editing, formatting, design, etc. In this section, we’ll review methods that can be used to support Open Access e-book publishing. Continue reading

Open Access eBooks, Part 2. What does Open Access Mean for e-books?

Reprinted from the Go To Hellman blog from Eric Hellman.  Here’s the second section of my draft of a book chapter for a book edited by No Shelf Required‘s Sue Polanka. I previously posted the introduction; subsequent posts will include sections on Business Models for Open Access E-Books, and Open Access E-Books in Libraries. Note that while the blog always uses “ebook” as one word, the book will use the hyphenated form, “e-book”. The comments on the first section have been really good; please don’t stop!  Comments can be directed to Eric via the Go To Hellman blog.

What does Open Access mean for e-books?
There are varying definitions for the term “open access”, even for journal articles. For the moment, I will use this as a lower-case term broadly to mean any arrangement that allows for people to read a book without paying someone for the privilege. At the end of the section, I’ll capitalize the term. Although many e-books are available for free in violation of copyright laws, I’m excluding them from this discussion.

Public Domain
The most important category of open access for books is work that has entered the public domain. In the US, all works published before 1923 have entered the public domain, along with works from later years whose registration was not renewed. Works published in the US from 1923-1963 entered the public domain 28 years after publication unless the copyright registration was renewed. Public domain status depends on national law, and a work may be in the public domain in some countries but not in others. The rules of what is in and out of copyright can be confusing and sometimes almost impossible to determine correctly. Continue reading

Open Access E-books Part One, from Eric Hellman

No Shelf Required: E-books in LibrariesI’ve been working on on a book chapter for a book edited by No Shelf Required‘s Sue Polanka. My chapter covers “Open Access E-Books”. Over the next week or two, I’ll be posting drafts for the chapter on the blog. Many readers know things that I don’t about this area, and I would be grateful for their feedback and corrections. Today, I’ll post the introduction, subsequent posts will include sections on Types of Open Access E-Books, Business Models for Open Access E-Books, and Open Access E-Books in Libraries. Note that while the blog always uses “ebook” as one word, the book will use the hyphenated form, “e-book”.

Open Access E-Books

As e-books emerge into the public consciousness, “Open Access”, a concept already familiar to scholarly publishers and academic libraries, will play an increasing role for all sorts of publishers and libraries. This chapter discusses what Open Access means in the context of e-books, how Open Access e-books can be supported, and the roles that Open Access e-books will play in libraries and in our society.

The Open Access “Movement”

Authors write and publish because they want to be read. Many authors also want to earn a living from their writing, but for some, income from publishing is not an important consideration. Some authors, particularly academics, publish because of the status, prestige, and professional advancement that accrue to authors of influential or groundbreaking works of scholarship. Academic publishers have historically taken advantage of these motivations to create journals and monographs consisting largely of works for which they pay minimal royalties, or more commonly, no royalties at all. In return, authors’ works receive professional review, editing, and formatting. Works that are accepted get placement in widely circulated journals and monograph catalogs. Continue reading

NSR is headed to the 33rd Buenos Aires International Book Fair

On Sunday I’m headed to Buenos Aires to attend the Buenos Aires International Book Fair, and in particular, the Argentine Library Association Annual Conference.  I’m very excited to have this opportunity to learn more about libraries, publishing and eBooks in Argentina and South America.  While there, I will be presenting a couple of session on ebooks in US libraries and reference services in academic libraries.  I hope to share some of what I learn about ebooks in South America on the blog, particularly information on the US Embassy Information Resource Centers.  Stay tuned for more information, photos, and perhaps an audio interview.

Ciao

ALAMW – ALA Washington Office Program on eBooks

Saturday, January 8th, ALA’s Washington Office is presenting, Turning the Page on E-books, a moderated discussion on the challenges and opportunities for libraries and their patrons from 8:30 – 10:00 a.m. in the Convention Center, Room 02.  Panelists and speakers include:  Brewster Kahle, Digital Librarian and Founder of the Internet Archive; Tom Peters, CEO of TAP Information Sources (huge contributor to the COSLA Report); Rich Weingarten, information technology and policy consultant, and Sue Polanka, moderator of No Shelf Required. Come and join the discussion.