Tag Archives: Nook

Library Journal Publishes Library eBook Survey Results – Sample Data Here

Last summer, Library Journal and School Library Journal conducted an eBook survey for libraries.  The survey was designed to measure current and projected ebook availability in libraries, user preferences in terms of access and subjects, and library purchasing terms and influences.  They included an academic, public, and school library version of the survey.  Hundreds of questions were asked and hundreds of libraries responded. The results of those surveys were published in November, 2010 in three separate reports.  The executive summaries of each are available on the Library Journal site (and linked below), and full reports are available for purchase.  There were 1,842 respondents, broken down to 364 academic, 781 public, and 697 school libraries.  I’ve captured some of the data to share with you, but the reports are full of additional information on budgets, marketing, barriers to adoption, patron preference, and much, much more.  A primer on ebook readers and formats is in the appendix of each full report. Thanks to Josh Hadro at Library Journal for sharing the reports with me and allowing me to publish some of the data here on No Shelf Required. Continue reading

Articles of Interest

Education World ® Technology Center: E-readers Bring E-xcitement and E-ase to Reading

Technolog – Kindle books now outsell paperbacks

Q&A: Smashwords Founder Mark Coker Predicts Drop in eBook Prices – eBookNewser

Apple Rejects Sony App, Kindle & Nook Beware – eBookNewser

HarperCollins Acquires Book From Community Writing Site Inkpop.com – eBookNewser

New Ebook Platforms Target the Scholarly Monograph

Why Amazon will never work with libraries

Very interesting blog post at ireaderreview.com on why Amazon will never work with libraries.  The blog is not an official Kindle site, and the writer is portraying his views from a big business perspective, so keep this in mind before you shoot through the roof with anger, librarians.  The comments are colorful as well, and worth a look.   Let’s say this IS true, and Amazon will never work with libraries.  Does this change your attitude toward loaning Kindles and buying content from Amazon to support the Kindles?  If nook, SONY, Kobo, and others are better suited for library content, would you rather buy, loan and promote these devices in your library? I would.

Articles of Interest

Ebook sales rise 130% in November

Is the $5.00 eBook the New $9.99 eBook? – eBookNewser

ALA Midwinter 2011: ALCTS Panel Considers the Impact of Patron-Driven Acquisition on Selection and Collections

Google Acquires eBook Technologies | News & Opinion | PCMag.com

Kobo adds 175K Education, Technical and Reference PDFs

Bridging the eBook-Library System Divide

Goodbye, DRM? FutureBook blog

Blio Partners with Dell ” PWxyz

Amid E-Book Growth, Students Still Prefer Paper Textbooks

Reader Apps vs. Dedicated Book Apps

Twitter Stats Reveal How the iPad, Kindle, and Nook Stack Up …

200% increase in eBook checkouts from OverDrive virtual libraries….and more stats

From an OverDrive press release:  Libraries and schools worldwide were at the forefront of the eBook boom in 2010, as patrons and students downloaded millions of digital books for iPhone®, Android™, Sony® Reader, NOOK™, and personal computers. More than one million new users signed on to access free eBooks, audiobooks, and more from ‘Virtual Branch’ websites last year, resulting in a 200 percent increase in eBook checkouts and a 52 percent increase in audiobook checkouts over 2009. To find eBooks, audiobooks, music, and video titles from a library near you, visit http://search.overdrive.com.

Key statistics for library eBooks, audiobooks, and more from OverDrive-powered digital catalogs include: Continue reading

Articles of Interest

Top 10 Articles of 2010 – Digital Book World

Amazon Kindle E-Reader Sales Will Keep Growing in 2011: 10 Reasons Why – Mobile and Wireless – News & Reviews – eWeek.com

Predictions for 2011 from Smashwords Founder – GalleyCat

How to add books to the iPad, iPhone, etc.

Check Out Library Books Using Your Phone – eBookNewser

David Thornburg on Open-Source Textbooks | Edutopia

Almost One-Third of Internet Users Plan to Buy a Kindle

Feeding Your E-book Habit: Borrowing From the Library — The …

Year One: The Born Digital Publisher – The Scholarly Kitchen

Go To Hellman: 2010 Summary: Libraries are Still Screwed

How to find free Kindle books

NOOK ereaders become biggest seller in B&N’s history

People will pay for digital content says Pew Internet & American Life Project

IDATE releases ebook report

Prediction for 2011 – The Individual Rules – The Scholarly Kitchen

Steve Haber: The Changing Role of Libraries in the Digital Age

OverDrive apps for iPhone and Android enable direct library downloads

OverDrive (www.overdrive.com) has released apps for iPhone® and Android™ that enable users to download library eBooks and audiobooks directly to their devices for the first time. The free apps include a “Get Books” feature that guides users to their local library’s digital catalog of best-selling and new release titles, allowing them to easily browse, check out, and download with just their device. More than 13,000 public libraries, schools, colleges, and universities now offer eBook and audiobook downloads via OverDrive, including institutions in the US, UK, Australia, Canada, and nine other countries. Continue reading

Primary Research Group releases Library Use of eBooks 2011 Edition

For those of you interested in eBook statistics related to libraries, this looks like a good candidate.

Primary Research Group has published Library Use of eBooks 2011 Edition, ISBN # 157440-157-2.

The report presents 145 pages of data and commentary on a broad range of eBook issues, including: spending on eBooks in 2010 and anticipated spending for 2011; use levels of various kinds of eBooks; market penetration by various specific eBook publishers; extent of use of aggregators vs offering by specific publishers; purchasing of individual titles; use of various channels of distribution such as traditional book jobbers and leading retail/internet based booksellers; use of eBooks in course reserves and interlibrary loan; impact of eBooks on print book spending; use of eBooks in integrated search; price increases for eBooks; contract renewal rates for eBooks; use of special eBook platforms for smartphones and tablet computers; spending plans and current use of eBook reader such as Nook, Reader and Kindle; the role played by library consortia in eBooks; Continue reading

Building an eReader Collection, the Duke University Library experience

I attended this fabulous and informative session during the Charleston Conference on building an eReader collection by Aisha Harvey, Nancy Gibbs, and Natalie Sommerville of Duke University Libraries.  I wanted to run my notes past the presenters first, to ensure accuracy, thus the tardiness of this post.

First and foremost, according to the librarians, the eReader lending program is a team approach and impacts every aspect of the way we build collections in libraries – access, selection, cataloging, ref, circ, etc.

Aisha Harvey, head of collections spoke first and provided an overview of the program.  Details:  began circ of kindles in January of this year, began with 18 kindles and then added 6 addition ones and 15 nooks.  Kindle has 1:6 title distribution on the kindle.  So, they call 6 kindles a “pod” and purchase multiple pods.  Pay $10 per title and share with 6 devices, average of $2.00 per title. Continue reading