Tag Archives: O’Reilly

Changing World of Digital Rights and Publishing Agreements – O’Reilly webinar summary

Dana Newman and Jenny Bent presented at the O’Reilly webinar, The Changing World of Digital Rights and Publishing Agreements.  My interpretation of the content is below; best efforts were made to ensure accuracy. Follow the comments on Twitter at #TOCCON.  Kat says the slides will be on slideshare and a recording will be available in about 24 hours.

Kat Meyer introduced the speakers.  Dana Newman is a transactional and intellectual property attorney (@DanaNewman).  Jenny Bent is a literary agent who founded the Bent Agency.  She represents writers and has had 5 make the NYT Best Sellers list.  (A twitter post suggested adding the publisher perspective to this session)

Dana Newman’s presented the content and Jenny inserted responses throughout.

  • State of Digital Rights and Contracts:  Older contracts were vague on electronic rights, Dana cited a case between Random House and the Wylie Agency. Courts said the right to exploit in book form did not include an e-book format.  Review existing contracts look at grant of rights and subsidiary rights section, were digital rights provided for and if so, how?  Negotiate amendments if they are not present in old contracts.
  • How are electronic rights being defined in current contracts?  There are many subcategories in current contracts: verbatim text converted into an ebook, is it apps, multimedia rights, or web-based content? Continue reading

Open Access eBooks, Part 3

From Eric Hellman’s Go To Hellman blog.  Please offer your comments to Eric at the Go To Hellman blog.

Here’s the third section of my draft of a book chapter for a book edited by No Shelf Required‘s Sue Polanka. I previously posted the introduction; and What does Open Access mean for eBooks subsequent posts will cover Open Access E-Books in Libraries. Note that while the blog always uses “ebook” as one word, the book will use the hyphenated form, “e-book”. The comments on the second section prompted me to make significant revisions, which I have posted.

Business Models for Creation of Open Access E-Books
Any model for e-book publishing must have a business model for recouping the expenses of production: reviewing, editing, formatting, design, etc. In this section, we’ll review methods that can be used to support Open Access e-book publishing. Continue reading

Open Access eBooks, Part 2. What does Open Access Mean for e-books?

Reprinted from the Go To Hellman blog from Eric Hellman.  Here’s the second section of my draft of a book chapter for a book edited by No Shelf Required‘s Sue Polanka. I previously posted the introduction; subsequent posts will include sections on Business Models for Open Access E-Books, and Open Access E-Books in Libraries. Note that while the blog always uses “ebook” as one word, the book will use the hyphenated form, “e-book”. The comments on the first section have been really good; please don’t stop!  Comments can be directed to Eric via the Go To Hellman blog.

What does Open Access mean for e-books?
There are varying definitions for the term “open access”, even for journal articles. For the moment, I will use this as a lower-case term broadly to mean any arrangement that allows for people to read a book without paying someone for the privilege. At the end of the section, I’ll capitalize the term. Although many e-books are available for free in violation of copyright laws, I’m excluding them from this discussion.

Public Domain
The most important category of open access for books is work that has entered the public domain. In the US, all works published before 1923 have entered the public domain, along with works from later years whose registration was not renewed. Works published in the US from 1923-1963 entered the public domain 28 years after publication unless the copyright registration was renewed. Public domain status depends on national law, and a work may be in the public domain in some countries but not in others. The rules of what is in and out of copyright can be confusing and sometimes almost impossible to determine correctly. Continue reading

Articles of Interest

Forget Netflix. E-book Publishers Need a Hulu: Tech News and …

Streaming or Buying Books: Will Readers Choose a Subscription Model for E-Books?

O’Reilly to Go Print on Demand – eBookNewser

We can surmise that e-book sales may be responsible for the steep downturns in the US and UK – Futurebook

Intel Capital, Condé Nast Owner Invest $30 Million in Kno; Intel to Consult on Student Tablet Hardware

At #LBF11: 24symbols – the Spotify Model for Books

24Symbols to launch ebook subscription service in June

Spanish Start-Up To Launch “Spotify For Books”

Kno secures $30 million in funding, leaves hardware business

Books | Libraries, publishers armed for e-book showdown | Seattle Times Newspaper

Might e-readers replace vanishing libraries?

Google Who? – Inside Higher Ed

Booked! Libraries, eBooks and Their Collections!

TOC – Inventory on Demand in the Digital Age

Inventory on Demand in the Digital Age

Panelists:  Laura Baldwin, O’Reilly Media and Phil Ollila, Ingram

Laura – reality of our biz, print and retail is still the bulk of the business. Print erosion cost, shipping costs, printing expenses, safety stock, operating capital are all factors in the profit/loss of publishers.

Strategically they wanted to deplete the amount of inventory and instead, make content available anywhere/anytime in a variety of formats. People expect faster cycle times (and not only in production).

Freedom plan – determine how to spend the capital.  Offset/digital short run (much smaller print runs, focused on shelf space awareness), back it up with print-to-order, combined with great forecasting tools. Continue reading

TOC – Publisher CTO Panel, the future of ebook technology, TeleRead

Summary of Tools of Change session, reprinted in full from Teleread.com by Paul Biba

Bill Godfrey (Elsevier), Rich Rothstein (HarperCollins Publishers), Andrew Savikas (O’Reilly Media, Inc.)Moderated by: Abe Murray (Google, Inc. )

Savikas: first foray in 1987. Stared with cd books and online books in 2001, which was first substantial digital presence. Wish is that Amazon would adopt epub as their standard. Digital is now about a decade for O’Reilly, and one of the biggest changes is that there are many more markets for digital products. Can’t imaging what it will be like in 10 years. Book will not go away – neither the package nor the long form narrative type of content. There will be a whole new category of new media that probably can’t be called books any more. Over the last 100 years more and more layers built up between publishers and consumers and web is bringing us back to a more direct relationship. In his experience the interest in enhanced ebooks seems to come from the publishers more than it does from the reader. Now that books can know that they are being read this can lead to enhanced opportunities. Databases are prime examples for turning into enhanced books. Not convinced that advertising will be as much of the future of newspapers and magazines it has been in the passed. Newspapers have lost the monopoly of being a source of local information. There is what value and need for what newspapers provide, but the package is obsolete. Publishers should be taking a stronger role in advocating with the retailers and device makers. Big piece of the epub 3 revision is to support dynamic delivery to different devices. Continue reading

TOC – Margaret Atwood Keynote

Margaret Atwood provided a keynote at TOC called, “The Publishing Pie: An Author’s View” Margaret admitted she is not a high tech person, but delivered her genuine, humorous keynote from the heart. She shared much of her experience with publishing, showing us rare pieces of her previous work, including her first book of poetry from 1946, Blue Bunny.  She was 6.  Her story of selling/signing one of her first books, The Edible Woman, was a treat.  She was set-up in the men’s department of a large department store, near the jockey shorts and socks.  Margaret said most of the men ran away, she sold only two copies.

Unfortunately, the live feed went out twice during the presentation (I was in the overflow room), so I missed much of “the publishing pie,” but I’ll be sure to watch it on the O’Reilly site.

Her final slide was signed….”Thank you for being here, Margaret Atwood.” Continue reading

Does DRM prevent eBook piracy?

No one seems to have this magic answer, but a recent article interviewing Brian O’Leary of Magellan Media offers some insight.  O’Leary described a 2 1/2 year study with O’Reilly media, stating:

“We undertook research two-and-a-half-years ago with O’Reilly, and we’ve been studying Thomas Nelson as well, to measure the impact of piracy on paid content sales. We approached it as if it were cooperative marketing. We would look at the impact of what sales looked like before there was piracy, say for four to eight weeks, and then we’d look at the impact of piracy afterward. Essentially, if the net impact of piracy is negative, then you would see sales fall off more quickly after piracy; if it were positive, the opposite.

Data that we collected for the titles O’Reilly put out showed a net lift in sales for books that had been pirated. So, it actually spurred, not hurt, sales. But we were only looking at O’Reilly and Thomas Nelson. The results are not emblematic of publishing overall. It could be more conservative, it could be less conservative. We just don’t have enough data. I’ve tried to get other publishers to join in, but it really hasn’t been a successful mission. Even at a low- or no-cost offer, publishers seem reluctant to collect the data required to reveal the true impact of book piracy.”

Later in the interview, O’Leary states, “Any good pirate can strip DRM in a matter of seconds to minutes.”  If you’d like to be one of these pirates, a recent blog post on WIRED offers step-by-step instructions on just how to remove DRM from eBook formats, compliments of the Apprentice Alf.

inkling – a new platform for mobile learning on iPhone/iPad

What do the words interactive, audio/video, social, modular, desktop, and mobile have in common?  They were all used by John Wiley’s Peter Balis during his Digital Book 2010 presentation to describe inkling, an end-to-end platform for mobile learning.  Peter’s presentation focused on how we learn now and beyond.  He demonstrated many interactive digital content products and  inkling was one of them.  It’s due out in the fall of 2010 and is designed to work with learning content on the iPhone and iPad.  Here’s a cut/paste of the vision statement from the inkling website:

… That’s why we’re building Inkling: a flexible software platform that replaces static, printed material with content that’s centered around the learner. We’re committed to empowering students to learn however they want, wherever they want. In the process, we’ll make education better for everyone involved.

Something tells me we will see a lot more from inkling and similar products supporting a flexible, digital textbook future.   Other Digital Book 2010 presentations are available online from OverDrive, Ingram, O’Reilly, and more.

Tools of Change – Ebook Contracts

Tools of Change – Ebook Contracts – Feb. 22 – 3:30 – 5:00

Cali Bush, O’Reilly Media – Cali is a non lawyer from the O’Reilly legal department.

Cali provided a perspective on eBook contracts from both the publisher and distributor side in 5 segments of her presentation.  While this was publisher/distributor specific, the terms and gotchas and gimmes are important for libraries to think about when reading their own contracts with publishers, aggregators, or distributors.  Cali referred to downstream rights where the rights going from authors to publishers to distributors decreases with each step.  This is an interesting thing to think about.  She didn’t include libraries or end users in her chart, however, but I would imagine they are even further downstream. Continue reading