Tag Archives: OverDrive

OverDrive mobile sites remember library card number

From an OverDrive blog post:  The days of having to dig your library card out when you’re trying to download an eBook at the doctor’s office (or park, or airport terminal, or a bar mitzvah) are over. With the latest update to OverDrive-powered mobile sites, users will have the option for their devices to store their library card numbers.

Starting now, when customers check out a title, the device will have a box where they can check “Remember me on this device.” The device will then hold the characters in its memory for 90 days after each use. This is an optional service. If a library requires a pin, it will still be required to check out titles.

This update is a part of OverDrive WIN, a series of platform enhancements that will streamline user experience and provide access to more content. Check back to see more enhancements to your service.

New interview with OverDrive’s Dan Stasiewski about the WIN Platform

During the ALA Conference I interviewed Dan Stasiewski, Public Relations Manager at OverDrive.  Dan and I discussed the new WIN platform and the enhanced OverDrive Help which will launch in a few months.  Dan provides some details on DRM, formats, patron-driven acquisition, and simultaneous use titles.

For more information, visit Overdrive.com or the Overdrive blog.  You can also Dan at dan@overdrive.com

Dan’s interview along with 40+ others are available on the NSR interviews page.

Forthcoming audio interviews for NSR – OverDrive, Britannica, ebrary

ALA is a great time to connect with librarians and publishers for audio interviews.  Today I met with Dan Stasiewski at OverDrive to discuss the new OverDrive WIN platform features and Rick Lumsden from Encyclopaedia Britannica to discuss the new Britannica eBook platform.  Tomorrow I’ll be with Matt Barnes of ebrary to discuss the new PDA business model and a recent survey ebrary conducted on downloadable ebooks.  I hope to get these posted early next week. Stay tuned.

OverDrive to provide DRM-free eBook titles from O’Reilly Media

This announcement from OverDrive to offer 1500 DRM free eBook titles from O’Reilly is in relation to the new WIN platform.  Great news!

More from the press release:  OverDrive announced today that booksellers, libraries, and schools in its global network will soon have access to DRM-free eBook titles from O’Reilly Media. The publisher’s entire eBook catalog will be available to OverDrive’s channel partners, including those in the US, UK, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and dozens of other territories worldwide. Bestselling eBooks on computer technologies available through the distribution agreement will include: “iPad 2: The Missing Manual, Second Edition,” “Head First Java, Second Edition,” and “Windows 7:Up & Running,” as well as O’Reilly’s legendary ‘animal books’ like “Learning PHP, MySQL, and JavaScript.” Continue reading

New – OverDrive WIN – platform enhancements that support libraries and offer patron driven acquisition

Great news from Ohio today – the Ohio Metro Library Directors and OverDrive met to discuss various eBook challenges.  OverDrive will launch Overdrive WIN, a series of platform enhancements this June.

More from the press release: As a result of unprecedented demand for eBooks, library directors, advocacy groups, and readers challenged leading eBook supplier OverDrive to find equitable and sustainable solutions to balance the interests of libraries and publishers. Key priorities for librarians include streamlined steps for customers to discover and borrow eBooks on a variety of platforms and devices, strong publisher support for library eBook lending programs, and additional options for digital book collections to meet the swell in demand. Continue reading

OverDrive app for Windows phone now available

More great news for OverDrive users.  The new Windows phone app is available for download from the Windows Phone Marketplace.

More from the press release:  Readers at 15,000 public, school, and corporate libraries can now download eBooks and audiobooks directly to their Windows Phone with the free OverDrive® Media Console™ app. This new app enables users to find a library that offers digital books, and then download and enjoy EPUB eBooks, as well as MP3 audiobooks, on their device. Libraries offer bestselling titles, such as “Water for Elephants” by Sara Gruen and “Unbroken” by Laura Hillenbrand, which can now be borrowed and enjoyed on popular Windows Phone devices, such as LG Quantum™, Samsung Focus™, and HTC Trophy™. Continue reading

Articles of Interest

Sorry for the long list, I was out last week and didn’t get to post this.

News: The E-Reader Effect – Inside Higher Ed

Ten must-have iPad apps for readers, by Jane Litte | TeleRead

Kindle/Nook Touch comparison review | TeleRead

E-Readers and the Future of Reading: Notes from Florida

Nook WiFi and Kobo eReader Touch Edition assault the Amazon Kindle fortress: a chart — Engadget

Creating a New University Press « The Scholarly Kitchen

Cambridge University Press to recreate textbooks for iPad | TeleRead

Amazon Makes Move to Join Book Publishing Big Leagues — Tech News and Analysis

Aptara Signs Inkling For Digital Textbooks – eBookNewser

Back to the Future: The Changing Paradigm for College Textbooks and Libraries — Campus Technology

Barnes & Noble goes after Kindle with Nook Simple Touch Reader

E-book report: Nook is up, iPad still catching up – USATODAY.com

What Patron-Driven Acquisition (PDA) Does and Doesn’t Mean: An FAQ « The Scholarly Kitchen

An Ebook Pilot Project Tests Collaboration of Publishers and Libraries

Overdrive, Evernote now support the NookColor | The Digital Reader

The Kno Textbook App Hits The iPad

Go To Hellman: EPUB Really IS a Container

Google books settlement conference settles on more time to settle | TeleRead

ALA TechSource webinar series – Integrating E-Books and E-Readers into Your Library

ALA TechSource has just opened registration for the upcoming webinar series on e-books and e-readers.  I hope you can join us.

Integrating E-Books and E-Readers into Your Library
with Sue Polanka

Two 90-minute sessions
Thursdays 8/4/11 and 8/11/11
2:30 – 4:00 PM EDT | 1:30 – 3:00 PM CDT
12:30 – 2:00 PM MDT | 11:30 AM – 1:00 PM PDT

With the exploding popularity of e-books and e-reading devices, librarians are grappling with how to effectively integrate them into their services and collections. Sue Polanka is back by popular demand to present this two-session ALA TechSource workshop on how to go about it. With her practical guidance you will learn how to begin purchasing and lending e-books for your library, and how to purchase e-reading devices for patron use. Continue reading

OverDrive accelerates eBook distribution for K-12 and higher education markets

From an OverDrive press release:

Educational and academic publishers can now reach schools around the world with hundreds of K-12 and higher education libraries now in OverDrive’s global network. New eBook publishers supplying to OverDrive-powered school, college, and university libraries include Houghton Mifflin, Evan-Moor Educational Publishers, Kaeden Publishing, Barnes Report, and ALA Editions. They join Barron’s Educational Series, Inc., Disney Digital Books, Elsevier Science, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Scholastic, Taylor & Francis, and many others in providing digital books to libraries via OverDrive. Continue reading

Open Access eBooks, part 4, by Eric Hellman

From Eric Hellman’s blog, Go To Hellman – The fourth section my book chapter on Open Access eBooks looks at theier relationship with libraries.  I previously posted the IntroductionWhat does Open Access mean for eBooks and Business Models for Creation of Open Access E-Books. I’ll be posting one more section, a conclusion.

Thank you for all of your comments; the completed chapter (and OA eBook) will be better for them.

Libraries and Open Access E-Books
One of the missions of libraries is to provide access to all sorts of information, including e-books. If an e-book is already open access, what role is left for libraries play?

Here’s a thought-experiment for libraries: imagine that the library’s entire collection is digital. Should it include Shakespeare? Should it include Moby Dick? These are available as public domain works from Project Gutenberg; providing these editions in a library collection might seem to be superfluous. Many librarians have been trying to convince their patrons that “free stuff on the Internet” is often inferior to the quality information available through libraries. There are certainly e-book editions of these works available for purchase with better illustrations, better editing, annotations, etc. Should libraries try to steer patrons to these resources instead of using the free stuff? Continue reading