Tag Archives: ResourceShelf

New Articles of Interest

Wow, ton of good things to read over the last 4 days, here’s a sampling of what I’ve been reading:

Digital Lending Goes into OverDrive

Digital Books Come of Age (Or) The Textbook is Dead; Long Live the Textbook

Kindle 3 vs Kindle 2 in size plus hands-on report by PC World’s Perenson

Cataloging and ILS: SkyRiver Files Antitrust Suit Against OCLC; Innovative Interfaces is Also Part of Suit « ResourceShelf

Final Report on E-Books & Public Libraries from Chief Officers of State Library Agencies (COSLA) « ResourceShelf

New Research (Full Text): Not as Web Savvy as You May Think; Young People, Web Search, and Credibility « ResourceShelf

Research-Assignment Handouts Offer Meager Guidance, Survey Finds – Faculty

The Future of the Academic Library – Inside Higher Ed

Demographics of an Audiobook User

Overdrive conducted a study of public library users of audiobooks, surveying 5 of their busiest sites.  The results concluded that audiobook listeners were:

  • 74% of users are female, between the ages of 30-59.
  • Nearly 70% have a college and/or postgraduate degree.
  • 60% learned about the download service from the library’s website (if our past blog posts and training sessions weren’t enough to get you to promote on your website, hopefully this is!)
  • 87% listen to audiobooks on an MP3 player, 44% of which are iPod users.
  • 33% of users own an eBook reader (e.g., Sony Reader, Barnes & Noble nook)
    For those who don’t own an eBook reader, 90% stated that compatibility of eBooks from the library is an important factor.

Hat tip to Resource Shelf

How eBook Catalogs at PL’s drive Publishers Sales

Thanks to Resource Shelf for the tip on this white paper from OverDrive – “How eBook Catalogs at Public Libraries Drive Publishers’ Book Sales and Profits.”

The conclusion states:  “As the market for eBooks continues to develop, the significance of public libraries will grow. Sales of eBooks to public libraries provide publishers with incremental revenue to supplement retail sales of print and digital books. As budgets for digital media at public libraries increase, eBook catalogs will drive sales of print and electronic media. The significant searchability, discovery, and exposure of publishers’ digital content in library catalogs will create more demand in all formats.”

Articles of Interest

Some interesting articles and blog posts these past couple weeks on e-books.  The New Yorker article on the iPad, the Kindle and the future of e-books is particularly good.

Google Book Settlement Market Analysis Q&A – 4/22/2010 – Library Journal

The iPad, the Kindle, and the future of books: newyorker.com

More Texas school districts look at whether to switch to online textbooks

Librarians Discuss E-books During Seminar at London Book Fair « ResourceShelf

Key Findings from New Report: Scholarly Book Publishing Practice Report 2010 « ResourceShelf

Ebook sales up 176.6% in 2009 and passes audiobook sales

Can eBooks Save University Presses?

Faculty Survey Warns of Potential Irrelevance for Academic Libraries, Suggests New Roles – 4/8/2010 – Library Journal

Come On In: The New Improved Open Library!

Several universities to issue iPads to students

International Children’s Digital Library to release iPad app

If you’re a book reader, should you buy an iPad? / The Christian Science Monitor – CSMonitor.com

eBook ISBN Survey

The International ISBN Agency is asking folks to take a 4 question survey about ISBN’s and their relation to eBooks.  For more information, visit the agency’s website. A document from Brian Green, the Executive Director, explaining the need for the survey is linked from the Resource Shelf blog.  Not sure why is wasn’t prominently on the International ISBN website.  Here is a brief statement about the survey with a link.

“Requirements for separate identification of different e-book versions
The International ISBN Agency is trying to establish requirements and the simple 4-question survey is designed to assess both the real needs of users and the ability of publishers to satisfy them.  We would be grateful for your response.”

Brian Green
International ISBN Agency
info@isbn-international.org

New articles of interest

Here’s one in the NYT – Cell Phone Apps Challenge the Rise of eReaders

Publishing Point meeting with Michael Healy, Executive Director, Book Rights Registry

Trial of e-textbook business models to start in UK

Samuelson Says She Has Same Pricing, Privacy Concerns About Google Settlement – 11/18/2009 – Library Journal

E-books go to college, but books still rule the campus, not Kindle — DailyFinance

Universities Boycott Amazon’s Kindle DX

Press Review+: Google Book Search Revised Settlement (2.0) Released; What About Libraries? « ResourceShelf

DOJ Response to the Google Book Settlement

Lots of news and blog sites are reporting on the Dept. of Justice response to the Google Book Settlement.

Teleread has a simple summary, referring folks to the 32 page DOJ official response, Resource Shelf summarizes a variety of news sources, and for a simple overview, see the DOJ Press Release.   The DOJ suggests the parties involved consider several changes to the agreement including:

  • imposing limitations on the most open-ended provisions for future licensing,
  • eliminating potential conflicts among class members,
  • providing additional protections for unknown rights holders,
  • addressing the concerns of foreign authors and publishers,
  • eliminating the joint-pricing mechanisms among publishers and authors, and,
  • whatever the settlement’s ultimate scope, providing some mechanism by which Google’s competitors can gain comparable access.