Tag Archives: Springer

Credo Reference adds new content

From a Credo Reference press release:

Hundreds of encyclopedias added to Credo’s award-winning reference platform this year.  Enhanced platform provides even more value for researchers

Boston and Oxford, (September 16, 2009) – It’s been a year since Credo Reference, the award winning online reference library, released its new platform, raising the standard for how online reference services should work for libraries. Since then, Credo has substantially expanded the academic content available on the platform, all at no additional cost for Credo Unlimited customers. Continue reading

Attention Libraries – Discounted eBooks – backlist titles 50% off

I’ve resisted posting information about sales and specials from various publishers and aggregators for fear of favoritism, but this eBook deal is pretty good, crosses many publishers, and could save libraries lots of money (which is the main reason I’ll post it).  If other aggregators have similar announcements, I’ll be glad to post those in order to be fair.  Here are the details: Continue reading

Charleston Conference – eBook preconference program

The Charleston Conference has announced their pre-conference program. There is one on eBooks – Wednesday, November 4th.

eBooks: Not Just Another Binding

Time: 9 am – 4 pm
Cost: $125

Speakers: Keith Powell, Head of Acquisitions, The UC Irvine Libraries ; Lisa Sibert, Electronic Resources Acquisitions Librarian, The UC Irvine Libraries; and Holly Tomren, Electronic Resources and Metadata Cataloger and Interim Head, Monograph Cataloging, The UC Irvine Libraries; Other speakers TBA – but will include representatives from Springer,Ingram Digital, and the Publishers Communication Group. Continue reading

New articles of interest

These articles are all linked on the NSR home page in the delicious links.

Espresso Book Machines: Lurch winning friends at Northshire Bookstore—whats next?

Michael Nielsen ” Is scientific publishing about to be disrupted?

The e-book wars: Google vs. Amazon vs. Apple—and how they may duke it out

Springer leaps ahead in academic e-book market

Arizona State Sued Over Kindle E-Textbook Usage – 7/2/2009 – Library Journal

Springer’s MyCopy Launches!

Pilot project successfully completed / Library users in the USA and Canada can order soft cover copies of Springer eBooks

Way to go Springer!  I loved this idea as a pilot, and love it even more now.  This is fantastic news for eBooks and end users.  I’ve never met an end user who didn’t want to push the print button on an eBook.  I wish you much success. sp Continue reading

ALAMW Technology Showcase

Those of you heading to Denver this weekend might want to check out several of the vendors presentations in the Technology Showcase (Show floor, aisle 800 or 2200).  The event is Monday, January 26th from 10:00 to 1:00.  Here are several eBook related vendors and times:

Credo Reference – 11:20 – 11:50 Pueblo Theater (aisle 800)

ebrary – 10:40 – 11:10 – Mesa Theater (aisle 2200)

Springer 12:40 – 1:10 – Mesa Theater (aisle 2200)

Springer’s MyCopy….$24.95 and it’s yours!

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Springer announced it’s new pilot print on demand service – MyCopy –  for “registered” patrons.  The service allows a library’s registered patrons to order a softcover print copy of an ebook the library has ALREADY purchased.  The copy is to be used by the patron for personal use.  11,000 titles are currently available, assuming your library owns all of those!  Books are printed in black and white with a color softcover.

Publishing will never be the same folks.  I hope Springer shares the title data with libraries.  That could be a useful collection development tool.

I couldn’t help but think about this on the way home today….but wouldn’t this be the best way for students to buy cheap textbooks?  Libraries subscribe to the ebooks of major textbook publishers and they all do print-on-demand for patrons at $24.95.  Oh wait, we are talking about textbook publishers here, better make that $99.95!�

eBooks, DRM, and ILL, a superior blend or a toxic cocktail?

My recent discussion with Cynthia Cleto from Springer got me thinking about some issues.  I’m curious if Springer’s model – no DRM and ILL rights – is unique or if other ebook publishers and aggregators offer similar things.  To me, it’s a superior blend, but I’m thinking that most publishers and aggregators feel it’s a toxic cocktail….

DRM – Digital Rights Management.  Springer uses none.  What about others?  I know the services with one book – one user biz models use DRM to control access and checkout/due dates.  But, there are many other services with unlimited simultaneous user access, full print and cut/paste features.  Are they using DRM?  Ones that come to mind are GVRL, Sage, Oxford, Greenwood, and Credo.

Interlibrary Loan – wow, I’ve never heard of any eBook service offering ILL.  Springer allows full ILL on its content, following normal ILL procedures.  Is anyone else doing this?   Typically, ebooks and ILL don’t mix, which is a major disadvantage of ebooks, probably one that is preventing many from taking the eBook route.   Traditionally, we’ve been able to send most of our purchased items via ILL, but with the advent of licensing agreements and authorized uses, we are losing our ILL rights.  It’s nice to see that Springer is not following that road.

I think I’ll start investigating more about DRM and ILL in the eBook world.  That will give me something else to rant about instead of my usual rant – one single platform!

If you have comments or more information on these issues, I’d love to hear them.