Tag Archives: SSP

Library as Purchaser, Analyzing Site Licensing

Very interesting post in SSP’s Scholarly Kitchen from June 14th – “The Latest Library As Purchaser Crisis:  Are We  Fighting the Wrong Battle?” by Kent Anderson.   Anderson discusses the site licensing issues between libraries and publishers, using examples from Nature, Elsevier, and Univ. of California system.  He says, ” The fatal flaw of site licensing is that it pits traditional allies against each other, effectively putting libraries and publishers on opposing teams.  This flaw points out how non-strategic site licensing has been for libraries and publishers.”

Here is a link to the University of California letter to faculty concerning this issue.

Site licensing appears to be the preferred business model for eBooks in academic libraries.  Are we making a mistake?

Professional/Scholarly ebooks account for more than 3 times the rest of the US ebook market combined

PSP’s Scholarly Kitchen blog posted the results of a study done by Al Greco, Professor of Marketing at Forham’s School of Business.

“According to Greco, book publishing (print and electronic) in the US is a $35 billion dollar industry. This year, he forecasts that ebooks will account for 5% of that revenue, or $1.76 billion. Of that $1.76 billion, trade books account for 8.6%, or $151 million; K-12 accounts for 8.1% ($143 million); higher education accounts for 6.9% ($122 million); and university presses account for 0.4% ($7.7 million). Professional and scholarly publishing titles represent 75.9% of the US ebook market, or $1.33 billion.” The full story can be read at Scholarly Kitchen.

Library Bypass – SSP blog post

Interesting post in the SSP’s blog – the Scholarly Kitchen, written by Joseph Esposito.  Esposito discusses “library bypass,” which as he describes, is another way for publishers to reach paying customers.  Esposito says that libraries have limited money and are partial in these times to open access materials, not another high priced package from a profitable publisher, so library bypass presents opportunities for publishers to sell to the end user.  He questions why libraries aren’t getting into this practice and discusses some challenges.  Dave Tykoson commented on the need for a “library pass-through” in his comment, one that offers alumni access to online resources for a small fee through the library.