Tag Archives: teleread

EPUB logo contest

The IDPF is hosting a contest for the design of the EPUB logo.  All individuals, companies, educational institutions and other groups are eligible to submit entries.  Entries must be received by May 7th at 2400 hours.  The winning design will receive $1000 cash and two tickets to attend the IDPF Digital Book 2010 at BEA.  For more information, see the IDPF website.  Thanks to teleread for the tip.

FlatWorld Knowledge Partners with B & N and NACS

I am reproducing this post from the teleread blog, thanks Paul!

Flat World, the publisher of commercial open source college textbooks, had partnered with Barnes & Noble College Booksellers and NACS Media Solutions to distribute their textbooks to over 3,000 college bookstores for the fall semester.

These are pilot programs and will launch in August. The average cost of a Flat Word textbook is $29.95 which, they say, is 75% lower than most conventional textbooks. The bookstores will receive digital files and the college instructors can then remix, reorder and add content. The stores than will use POD to provide paper copies.

(sp) I saw a presentation from FlatWorld at the TOC conference and discussed them in my top 10 takeaways from the conference. They have an interesting business model, I’ll be anxious to see if they find success at the college bookstores.

College Bookstores to add Espresso Book Machines

Expect to find print on demand textbooks and other academic and trade titles available for POD in college bookstores very soon.  From a press release, “NACS Media Solutions (NMS), a
subsidiary of the National Association of College Stores (NACS) and On Demand Books LLC (ODB), the maker of the Espresso Book Machine® (EBM), have entered into a joint agreement
whereby NMS will market the EBM to the collegiate marketplace and permission academic content for distribution throughout the worldwide network of EBMs.”  No word on pricing.  Thanks to Teleread for the info.

The new iPad, it sounds like a dream date

Been watching the twits about the iPad – “extraordinary,”  “a dream to type on,” “much more intimate than a laptop,” “the best browsing experience you’ve ever had.”  Sounds like they are describing a dream date (sans the laptop and browsing). Oh wait, now they are talking about pinching folders, ouch.

Seriously – it appears to be a bigger and better iPod Touch.  Multimedia viewing, full keyboard, pictures, email, ebooks, music, google maps, existing apps, yadda yadda.  I’m sure I’ll own one soon, but it doesn’t sound like they’ve introduced anything we haven’t seen in other devices – it will just be better of course because it’s Apple.

Not too much on ebooks thus far and nothing on textbooks.  Anxious to find out more about that.

added later – just read a nice post on teleread about the ebook options on the new ipad.   iBooks – EPUB…this really is a dream date!

Webinar on eBook Standards

Thanks to TeleRead for the heads up on this one.

eBook  Readers and Standards…..Where to Next?

Webinar, November 18th, 11:00 EST

Speakers:  Michael Smith, Director of the IDPF and Sarah Rotman Epps, eBook Market Analyst at Forrester

As the eBook market rapidly unfolds, it seems to get more complex by the day. Publishers are struggling to adapt as competitive and consumer pressures demand that their titles be compatible with the multitude of new eBook applications and eReaders coming to market. To develop a successful eBook production strategy, you need to take a clear position on where the market is today and will be tomorrow. In this 60-minute webinar, Sarah Rotman Epps, Forrester’s eBook Market Analyst, and Michael Smith, Director of the International Digital Publishing Forum (IDPF) which manages the ePub standard, present their highly informed views on the future for eBook readers, formats and standards. How will it all shake out? Join these two industry experts to get the inside track on the future and better position yourself to take advantage of the biggest driver of industry innovation to hit the publishing world in decades – eBooks.

register

DOJ Response to the Google Book Settlement

Lots of news and blog sites are reporting on the Dept. of Justice response to the Google Book Settlement.

Teleread has a simple summary, referring folks to the 32 page DOJ official response, Resource Shelf summarizes a variety of news sources, and for a simple overview, see the DOJ Press Release.   The DOJ suggests the parties involved consider several changes to the agreement including:

  • imposing limitations on the most open-ended provisions for future licensing,
  • eliminating potential conflicts among class members,
  • providing additional protections for unknown rights holders,
  • addressing the concerns of foreign authors and publishers,
  • eliminating the joint-pricing mechanisms among publishers and authors, and,
  • whatever the settlement’s ultimate scope, providing some mechanism by which Google’s competitors can gain comparable access.

Amazon yanks content

Is this fuel for the anti DRM fire or what?

Teleread.org – You really DON’T own your Amazon ebooks

Posted: 17 Jul 2009 06:43 AM PDT

Got this email from John Hagewood and it just had to be shared with you:

Weirdness in Kindle-land:

this morning I got an email from Amazon saying:

We’re writing to confirm that we have processed your refund for
$0.99 for the above-referenced order.

The total refund amount will be credited to your credit card in
3-5 business days.

The following is the breakdown of your refund:
Animal Farm by George Orwell. Published by MobileReference (mobi)
Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
Continue reading

Kirtas teams with OCLC to ease access to digital content

From Teleread.org

By Paul Biba

Picture 2.pngStill another digital deal being done. The more the merrier! From a press release I received from Kirtas:

Kirtas Technologies, the worldwide leader in bound-book digitization, and OCLC, a global online library service and research organization; have signed an agreement that will enable streamlined access to the ever-increasing numbers of digitized books to users of OCLC’s WorldCat and Kirtasbooks.com. Continue reading

E-textbooks not ready for college students yet?

From Teleread   By David Rothman

image 6 Lessons One Campus Learned about E-Textbooks is the headline over Jeffrey R. Young’s article in the Chronicle of Higher Education. But perhaps it should read instead, “E-textbooks not ready for college students yet, at least in many cases.”

Northwestern Missouri State University used the Sony Reader in a pilot study and, according to Young, found that students demanded printed books instead because of navigation problems with E.

Mind you, this wasn’t with the new PRS-700, which lets you use a stylus to move around. So maybe the results would have been different. Continue reading