Tag Archives: Triangle Research Libraries Network

Beyond Print Summit from TRLN – meeting materials

The Triangle Research Libraries Network (TRLN) held a Summit in August called “Beyond Print.” They have recently posted the meeting materials on their site, including slides, analysis, and future steps.

From the website:  Beyond Print is an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation funded project to develop new business models and licensing terms for the cooperative acquisition of e-books. The Triangle Research Libraries Network (TRLN) has a long history of cooperative collection development policies that distribute subject and language responsibilities among member libraries to minimize overlap and maximize breadth of coverage.  Higher e-book prices for single institutions, and weighty multipliers to enable inter-institutional access, threaten this investment and the future of scholarly sharing.

A key element of the project was to convene representatives from library consortia together with vendors and publishers to explore new and mutually sustainable models as research libraries make the print to electronic transition in their book collections. The TRLN Beyond Print Summit was held in Chapel Hill, NC on August 22-23, 2011. Join us at the Charleston Conference where we will continue the conversation.

Articles of Interest

For the week of March 21st

Inkling: Another Digital Textbook Approacheth, But this time, It has Friends: The Scholarly Kitchen

Research Triangle Libraries Get $41K Grant To Explore Consortial Ebook Models

The Vexed Problem of Libraries, Publishers, and E-books ” The …

HarperCollinsGate: Some Thoughts ” The Scholarly Kitchen

Innovation and Longevity in Digital Publishing: Surfing the S Curve – The Scholarly Kitchen

Amazon Appstore for Android is open

E-book pricing hinges on customer perception of value

Google Books Settlement statements of: AAP, Open Book Alliance, Nat. Fed. of the Blind

Judge Rules Against Google Books Settlement

North Carolina libraries receive grant to develop new eBook business models & make statements on values

Library Journal reported today that the four universities that make up the Triangle Research Libraries Network received a $41,000 grant from the Mellon Foundation to develop new models for consortial ebooks pricing and acquisition.

From LJ:  “Some answers to the ebook model dilemma may be in the offing, from the Triangle Research Libraries Network (TRLN)—a collaborative organization of the libraries of North Carolina-based Duke University, North Carolina State University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and North Carolina Central University—which announced that it has received a $41,000 grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to develop new models for consortial ebook pricing and acquisition.”

A colleague also forwarded to me today a value statement for the Scholarly Ebook Marketplace from North Carolina State University.  It is reprinted below in full. Continue reading

The Charleston Conference – top 10 thoughts

The following summary of the Charleston Conference was written by Sylvia Miller from the University of North Carolina Press, and author of “Publishing the Long Civil Rights Movement” blog.  It is reposted with permission

Trains and battleships were two of the most telling metaphors that presenters at last week’s Charleston Conference used in their attempt to describe the strength, speed, and scariness of the changes currently taking place in academic librarianship and scholarly publishing.  The news media and press outlets that focus on education and publishing seem to regard 2009 as a tipping point for public acceptance and business success of e-books.   The speakers at this conference attended by 1,000 academic librarians and scholarly publishers clearly recognized that this enormous change is upon us.

In a talk entitled “I Hear the Train A Comin’”  Kevin Guthrie, President of Ithaka, asked, “When the tracks and the cars come up to everyone’s door, what happens to the beautiful old train station?”  He was of course referring to the impact of the Web on libraries, many of which may no longer be needed as physical repositories of content duplicated down the street, across town, and online.

Responding to this year’s conference theme “Necessity Is the Mother of Invention,” several speakers urged librarians to act quickly and strongly for positive change.   Ivy Anderson of the California Digital Library said that reorienting libraries toward the future was “like turning a battleship around.”  In an inspiring keynote speech, David Lankes of the Information Institute of Syracuse memorably referred to the dubious efficacy of “conducting exit interviews on the deck of the Titanic“!

Lankes urged librarians to recognize their mission “to improve society through facilitating knowledge creation in their communities” and become innovative, proactive leaders.  When I described the speech to a colleague here at UNC Press, she immediately said, “That could also apply to publishers!”  I told her that in fact the first audience member to comment during the Q&A session said exactly that.  In another plenary speech, Douglas Armato of the University of Minnesota Press concluded, speaking of libraries and publishers, “If we’re not dealing with this evolution together, we should be.”
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