Tag Archives: University of North Carolina Press

Oxford University Press Scholarship Online adds University of North Carolina Press

NEW YORK, February 5, 2014—Oxford University Press is pleased to announce it will partner with the University of North Carolina Press to launch North Carolina Scholarship Online on OUP’s University Press Scholarship Online (UPSO) platform to take advantage of a fully enabled XML environment with cutting-edge search and discovery functionality.

“The University of North Carolina Press is honored and excited to be a part of the University Press Scholarship Online platform,” said John Sherer, Director of The University of North Carolina Press.  “Part of our 10-decade long tradition has been to disseminate the work of our authors as broadly as possible and this new partnership will achieve that in a dynamic new way.” Continue reading

Enhanced e-books and “portal books” – publisher/library partnerships

The following is the second post from Sylvia Miller, Project Director, “The Long Civil Rights Movement,” University of North Carolina Press.  This post discusses enhanced e-books and “portal books,” those that offer multimedia links from annotations within the book.

This is a follow up to a recent posting on what we have learned from the LCRM Project’s online publishing pilot.

This blog post has two sections:

1.  Publisher-library partnerships and enhanced e-books
2.  Links to related “portal books” projects and enhanced e-books Continue reading

Lessons Learned: The UNC Press ‘Long Civil Rights Movement’ pilot project summarized

Sylvia Miller, Project Director for “Publishing the Long Civil Rights Movement,” University of North Carolina Press has given me permission to post in entirety, the following.  It is a summary of the Long Civil Rights Movement pilot project, which took place over the past 14 months.

This post contains 4 sections:

1. Close of the online pilot
2. The expected, the unexpected, and in between
3. What did we learn?
4. What is next for the LCRM Project?

Coming soon:  A follow-up post on enhanced e-books Continue reading

Books at JSTOR adds Four New Academic Presses

A JSTOR Press Release:  Four prominent academic publishers in the United States announced plans today to bring their scholarly books online at JSTOR, one of the most well-known and widely used scholarly research sites. This is the second wave of presses to join the Books at JSTOR initiative. The initial group included Chicago, Minnesota, North Carolina, Princeton, and Yale University Presses.

“The digital landscape is taking shape for academic books, and we are thrilled to be partnering with a set of publishers that share our commitment to disseminating superior scholarship and an organization that has a great track record of meeting the needs of libraries and researchers,” said Alison Mudditt, Director of University of California Press. Continue reading

“Books at JSTOR”

Last week I posted a very brief announcement about JSTOR and eBooks.  I’ve since been emailed this more thorough press release.

January 11, 2011 – New York, NY – Five of the nation’s leading university presses – Chicago, Minnesota, North Carolina, Princeton, and Yale – are at the forefront of a new effort to publish scholarly books online as part of the non-profit service JSTOR.  Their books, representing ground-breaking scholarship across the humanistic, social, and scientific disciplines, are expected to be available in 2012. Continue reading

4 Principles for E-book Discovery & Visability

Here is another blog post from Sylvia Miller, Director of “Publishing the Civil Rights Movement” at the University of North Carolina Press, summarizing a Charleston Conference presentation.  It is reprinted with permission.  (Thanks Sylvia, you are making my job easy!)

At the Charleston Conference, I attended an all-day preconference workshop on e-books organized by Sue Polanka of Wright State University (who runs the blog No Shelf Required), Carolyn Morris of Coutts Information Services, and Janet Fischer of Publishers Communication Group, Inc. I was especially impressed with the final talk of the day, given by Anh Bui of HighWire Press, Stanford University–probably because she said things that support the ideas in our Long Civil Rights Movement online pilot!
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The Charleston Conference – top 10 thoughts

The following summary of the Charleston Conference was written by Sylvia Miller from the University of North Carolina Press, and author of “Publishing the Long Civil Rights Movement” blog.  It is reposted with permission

Trains and battleships were two of the most telling metaphors that presenters at last week’s Charleston Conference used in their attempt to describe the strength, speed, and scariness of the changes currently taking place in academic librarianship and scholarly publishing.  The news media and press outlets that focus on education and publishing seem to regard 2009 as a tipping point for public acceptance and business success of e-books.   The speakers at this conference attended by 1,000 academic librarians and scholarly publishers clearly recognized that this enormous change is upon us.

In a talk entitled “I Hear the Train A Comin’”  Kevin Guthrie, President of Ithaka, asked, “When the tracks and the cars come up to everyone’s door, what happens to the beautiful old train station?”  He was of course referring to the impact of the Web on libraries, many of which may no longer be needed as physical repositories of content duplicated down the street, across town, and online.

Responding to this year’s conference theme “Necessity Is the Mother of Invention,” several speakers urged librarians to act quickly and strongly for positive change.   Ivy Anderson of the California Digital Library said that reorienting libraries toward the future was “like turning a battleship around.”  In an inspiring keynote speech, David Lankes of the Information Institute of Syracuse memorably referred to the dubious efficacy of “conducting exit interviews on the deck of the Titanic“!

Lankes urged librarians to recognize their mission “to improve society through facilitating knowledge creation in their communities” and become innovative, proactive leaders.  When I described the speech to a colleague here at UNC Press, she immediately said, “That could also apply to publishers!”  I told her that in fact the first audience member to comment during the Q&A session said exactly that.  In another plenary speech, Douglas Armato of the University of Minnesota Press concluded, speaking of libraries and publishers, “If we’re not dealing with this evolution together, we should be.”
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Attention Libraries – Discounted eBooks – backlist titles 50% off

I’ve resisted posting information about sales and specials from various publishers and aggregators for fear of favoritism, but this eBook deal is pretty good, crosses many publishers, and could save libraries lots of money (which is the main reason I’ll post it).  If other aggregators have similar announcements, I’ll be glad to post those in order to be fair.  Here are the details: Continue reading

Daily Lit Partners with University of North Carolina Press

Daily Lit, the leading publisher of serialized books in digital format, recently announced a partnership with the University of North Carolina Press.  Several UNC Press books will be digitized, including two children’s titles – Teach’s Light and Taffy of Torpedo Junction.

I really enjoy the format of Daily Lit titles.  I get a daily email (RSS also available) with 1 – 3 minutes of reading from a title.  It’s an easy way to read in small doses.  For more information about Daily Lit, see previous NoShelfRequired posts from 9/29/08 and 11/21/08