Tag Archives: Wikipedia

ALA annual programs on e-Reference preservation and the impact of wikipedia

As you prepare your ALA Annual schedule, please consider the following two programs sponsored by the RUSA Reference Publishing Advisory Committee and the Reference Books Bulletin Advisory Board.
RUSA Reference Publishing Advisory Committee Program:
Reference Publishing: Preservation Trends & Issues – June 25 Sat 1:30-3:30
As electronic reference products transform to electronic formats, often with continuously updated content instead of one time publications, new challenges for archiving and preservation arise. Building on recent developments for archiving electronic books and journal content, this program will highlight the issues and challenges of preserving free and licensed e-reference content as well as foster discussion on possible solutions.
Panelists:
  • Heather Ruland Staines, Sr. Manager eOperations at Springer Science + Business Media
  • Ken DiFiore, Associate Director, Outreach & Participation Services,Portico
  • Marie McCaffrey, Executive Director, HistoryLink.org
  • Jacob Nadal, Preservation Officer, UCLA Library

Reference Books Bulletin Advisory Board Program:
The Wikipedia Effect: How Wikipedia Has Changed the Way the World Finds and Evaluates Information – Monday June 27 10:30-12 Convention Center 345

Open Access eBooks, Part 3

From Eric Hellman’s Go To Hellman blog.  Please offer your comments to Eric at the Go To Hellman blog.

Here’s the third section of my draft of a book chapter for a book edited by No Shelf Required‘s Sue Polanka. I previously posted the introduction; and What does Open Access mean for eBooks subsequent posts will cover Open Access E-Books in Libraries. Note that while the blog always uses “ebook” as one word, the book will use the hyphenated form, “e-book”. The comments on the second section prompted me to make significant revisions, which I have posted.

Business Models for Creation of Open Access E-Books
Any model for e-book publishing must have a business model for recouping the expenses of production: reviewing, editing, formatting, design, etc. In this section, we’ll review methods that can be used to support Open Access e-book publishing. Continue reading

Open Access eBooks, Part 2. What does Open Access Mean for e-books?

Reprinted from the Go To Hellman blog from Eric Hellman.  Here’s the second section of my draft of a book chapter for a book edited by No Shelf Required‘s Sue Polanka. I previously posted the introduction; subsequent posts will include sections on Business Models for Open Access E-Books, and Open Access E-Books in Libraries. Note that while the blog always uses “ebook” as one word, the book will use the hyphenated form, “e-book”. The comments on the first section have been really good; please don’t stop!  Comments can be directed to Eric via the Go To Hellman blog.

What does Open Access mean for e-books?
There are varying definitions for the term “open access”, even for journal articles. For the moment, I will use this as a lower-case term broadly to mean any arrangement that allows for people to read a book without paying someone for the privilege. At the end of the section, I’ll capitalize the term. Although many e-books are available for free in violation of copyright laws, I’m excluding them from this discussion.

Public Domain
The most important category of open access for books is work that has entered the public domain. In the US, all works published before 1923 have entered the public domain, along with works from later years whose registration was not renewed. Works published in the US from 1923-1963 entered the public domain 28 years after publication unless the copyright registration was renewed. Public domain status depends on national law, and a work may be in the public domain in some countries but not in others. The rules of what is in and out of copyright can be confusing and sometimes almost impossible to determine correctly. Continue reading

TOC Keynote- Kevin Kelly, Wired

What Technology Wants, Kevin’s new book.  He says it’s the last paper book he’ll write because he is learning so much about digital publishing.

Kevin’s keynote discussed “What’s Next” in his view and he offered 6 trends (verbs), screening, interacting, sharing, accessing, flowing, generating.

Screening – screens everywhere, we are moving from people of the book, where author/authority go hand in hand, to people of the screen.  We are surrounded by screens, screens are becoming cheap enough to put anywhere.  This will be the context where we will publish books.  eInk, could it become bound into a flexible book? Screens are the portals into the machine for everything – books, TV, video, radio, web, etc..  One screen for all.  Orality – Literacy – Visuality. Continue reading

Articles of Interest

The case for the dedicated e-reader: When is it time to go off the grid

Inkling for iPad: eTextbook Reading Done Right

NBC video: Checking out library e-books

The Future Of Reading

University of Texas San Antonio opens nation’s first bookless library on a university campus

Kobo desktop application now available for download

Playing Hard to Get: Purchasing and Reading E-Books

Wikipedia for Credit – Inside Higher Ed

The All E-Book Diet – Inside Higher Ed

TeleRead meets with Sony in New York to see Sony’s new ereaders; impression – sophisticated refinement

Michael Bills of Baker & Taylor on the Future of Ebooks and Libraries

Independent Reference Publishers Group (IRPG) Meeting Summary – ALA Conference

Each Friday before the ALA Conference, the Independent Reference Publishers Group (IRPG) gets together to have a program and discussion of issues surrounding reference publishing.  The ALA Annual meeting was no exception.  A large group of publishers and librarians gathered to figure out, “how did we get here?”  A panel of librarians, LIS instructors, reference contributors, and wholesalers, organized by Peter Tobey at Salem Press, presented some thoughts and challenges for reference content and reference publishing.  A summary of these comments is below.  The panelists included:  Buffy Hamilton, a teacher/librarian from Creekview H.S. in Canton, GA and blogger at The Unquiet Librarian and 1/4 blogger for Libraries and Transliteracy;  Sue Polanka (me);  Dave Tyckoson, Associate Dean of the Madden Library, CSU – Fresno;  Bernadette Low, a frequent contributor to reference content from the Community College of Baltimore City;  William Taylor, Manager, Continuations iSelect (R) and Standing Orders at Ingram Content Group;  and Jessica Moyer, a doctoral candidate in literacy education at the U of Minnesota and instructor of a MLIS reference course. Continue reading

Reference: The Missing Link in Discovery – webinar summary

Today, Joe Janes from Univ. of Washington, Mike Sweet from Credo, and myself had a great conversation on reference content, student research habits, and how reference content can be more discoverable during the LJ webinar “Reference: The Missing Link in Discovery.”

Joe highlighted research results from OCLC Perceptions study and 2 studies at the University of Washington – Project Information Literacy and use of Wikipedia for course-related research which focused on the changing research behaviors of students.  He also addressed the teaching of reference sources to librarians, comparing his learning of sources years ago to today’s focus on content over containers.  He speculated on various reference sources that have gone away, transitioned, and what still persists. Continue reading

LJ Webinar – Reference: The Missing Link in Discovery

WEBCAST NAME:Reference: The Missing Link in Discovery
SPONSORED BY: Credo Reference and Library Journal
EVENT DATE: Tuesday, May 11, 2010 – 2:00 PM EDT Time – 60 minutes

Register Online – It’s FREE Continue reading

Credo Launches Topic Pages

I wrote a piece on Credo’s Topic Pages a couple of weeks ago, but here is the official press release announcing the launch of the Topic Page Beta.

Credo Launches Topic Page Beta
The Librarian’s Answer to Wikipedia

Boston and Oxford, (April 8, 2010) – The data is undeniable, a significant majority of today’s researchers turn to Wikipedia at some point in the research process, very often at the beginning, or “presearch” phase of research. Now, Credo Reference is pleased to announce an easy-to-use alternative for researchers – Credo Topic Pages – that help answer the question, “Where do I start?”
Continue reading