Tag Archives: Wright State University

LJ Webinar – Reference: The Missing Link in Discovery

WEBCAST NAME:Reference: The Missing Link in Discovery
SPONSORED BY: Credo Reference and Library Journal
EVENT DATE: Tuesday, May 11, 2010 – 2:00 PM EDT Time – 60 minutes

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4 Principles for E-book Discovery & Visability

Here is another blog post from Sylvia Miller, Director of “Publishing the Civil Rights Movement” at the University of North Carolina Press, summarizing a Charleston Conference presentation.  It is reprinted with permission.  (Thanks Sylvia, you are making my job easy!)

At the Charleston Conference, I attended an all-day preconference workshop on e-books organized by Sue Polanka of Wright State University (who runs the blog No Shelf Required), Carolyn Morris of Coutts Information Services, and Janet Fischer of Publishers Communication Group, Inc. I was especially impressed with the final talk of the day, given by Anh Bui of HighWire Press, Stanford University–probably because she said things that support the ideas in our Long Civil Rights Movement online pilot!
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Charleston eBook Preconference – eBook standards session

Yesterday at the Charleston Conference we hosted a preconference on eBooks, titled “eBooks: Not just another binding.”  Carolyn Morris from Coutts, James Galbraith from OCLC, Janet Fischer from PCG Industries, and Sue Polanka from Wright State University organized the preconference.  There were 5 sessions on a variety of topics.  The discussion was great, questions were thought provoking, and feedback was excellent.  A great big thanks to all of our speakers for sharing their time and expertise.

The presentations from the sessions will be posted here on the NSR blog.  The first session was on eBook standards, presented by Emilie Delquie of PCG and Randy Petway of Publishing Technologies.  Their presentations are attached below.  Contact information for each speaker is in the slides.

Session 1 – eBook Standards

Our speakers will examine ebook standards from an industry and library perspective, specifically: What standards exist? What standards should exist? What librarians want in the way of ebook standards.

Emilie Delquie, Head of Research, Publishers Communication Group presentation

Randy Petway, Exec Vice President, Strategy & Business Development, Publishing Technology presentation

Last chance for Charleston eBook preconference

If you are headed to Charleston next week and have Wednesday free, please consider attending the preconference.  The full program is listed here. Summaries/highlights will be posted to the blog after the event.

EBOOKS:  NOT JUST ANOTHER BINDING
XXIX CHARLESTON CONFERENCE – ISSUES IN BOOK AND SERIAL ACQUISITION
CHARLESTON, SC, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2009:

eBooks are not just another binding. As with any new technology, librarians and publishers are discovering many challenges in implementing ebooks. This full day pre-conference will explore several of these challenges including: ebook standards, such as epub, DRM, interface features, and archiving; ebook readers and their use by aggregators and libraries; workflow issues in libraries like approval plans and catalog records; ebook economics including business models and transitioning from P to E; and the issues surrounding the discoverability and visibility of ebooks.
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eBook Standards – summary of NISO/BISG program

Last Friday at ALA I was part of a NISO/BISG panel on the changing standards landscape.  There were many speakers, each discussing various aspects of eBook standards like business models, ISBNs, epub, DRM, and the standards and features needed by librarians (which was my part).  I’ve summarized my presentation here and would welcome additional suggestions and ideas from librarians.  Sue Continue reading

Booklist launches new reference blog

CHICAGO—Booklist Online announces the addition of Points of Reference to its growing family of blogs. Mary Ellen Quinn and a team of front-line experts from academic, public and school libraries post about reference sources and trends in reference publishing and services. Continue reading

ALA Program -Rethinking the Reference Collection

Booklist/Reference Books Bulletin: Rethinking the Reference Collection
ALA PUBLISHING
McCormick Place West W-179
Monday, July 13, 2009, 10:30 – 12:00

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Finally, a Textbook Program for Students with Disabilities

Being part of the Wright State University community has given me a whole new perspective on students with disabilities.  Approximately 10% of our population is part of this community.  It is very difficult for these students to get their textbooks and other course material in a format appropriate to their needs.  That has just been made easier with the announcement of the U.S. College and University Partnership with Bookshare.  Bookshare is the largest accessible online library for people with print disabilities.  Their press release contains all the details of this new program.  Text of this release is also below, click on more.   Continue reading

Reference Publishers Debate Single Platform

On the Friday of the ALAMW Conference, the Independent Reference Publishers Group met for a panel presentation/discussion on using one single platform to host all reference content.  It was an interesting discussion.  I’ve summarized the panel in my notes below.

Independent Reference Publishers Group Meeting

Friday, January 23, 2009

Representatives from the following organizations were in attendance: Choice, CQ Press, Omnigraphics, Sharpe, ifactory, Sage, Salem, Neal Schumann, ABC-CLIO, Rosen, Credo Reference, Serials Solutions, NISO, Booklist, CHOICE, Wright State University.

The theme of this meeting and panel discussion was instituting a single platform for electronic reference content. Sue Polanka from WSU started things off with her wish list and each publisher had a chance to respond.

Sue Polanka – Wright State University

One day I’d like to purchase/license all of my reference content, regardless of publisher, and load it on the platform of my choice for the best cross searching available. This platform could be an existing one, like GVRL, Credo, ebrary, EBL, NetLibrary, etc. or some shareware, something developed by libraries. Benefits to patrons and librarians include: Greater access, more content, single search interface for ease of use and discoverabilty, easy to implement in library instruction and on web sites. These systems need to have unlimited simultaneous use, 24/7 access, with no DRM or other restrictions on downloading or printing, the most multimedia available during today’s expensive economic times and an actual ebook price, up front, would be appreciated.

Todd Carpenter – NISO

One platform has barriers to interoperability and they are bigger than technological, as in political and economic. [barriers shouldn’t prevent us from trying to do this. IRPG would be a good venue to discuss this. Seems like publishers would want to do this for reasons of – more exposure, and less cost of producing pricey interfaces – has anyone ever heard of epub or the IDPF? SP]

Peter McCracken – Serials Solutions

Federated products are often a starting point for research and therefore have an opportunity to have a reference role. The current design doesn’t work best for the patron since they get mostly articles. Somehow relevance needs to be a factor to assign tags to reference and get them to the top. We need to use field mapping more effectively. [I prefer a pre-indexed approach since federated products tend to be slow. Publishers/aggregators should take advantage of all metadata and tag reference items appropriately. If federated products are used, the reference content should be faceted as “overview material” or “background information.” SP]

Rolf Janke – Sage Reference

Publishers still have an infrastructure that supports print publishing.  The infrastructure is a difficult component to downsize in favor of doing more digital publishing. Print is a one size fits all model yet e publishing is not so, publishers have a multitude of business models, interfaces, features, etc.  The concept of a one size fits all platform for all publishers content is way ahead of its time, publishers currently could never agree on a standard business model. Pricing standards could help, but are not likely. [Gee, these must be the political and economic barriers that Todd was referring to? Looks like publishers could learn about collaboration from libraries. SP]

Ron Boehm – ABC-CLIO

Publishers need to invest in new things while maintaining our print production, which is expensive for publishers, particularly in these bad economic times. Right now we need to do both [e and p] or we would lose half of our business. The best strategy for ebooks is to have unlimited access. Ron supports the idea of publishers working with multiple aggregators or distributors to have reference content available in a multitude of platforms, but doesn’t recommend the libraries/consortia maintain their own platform. [Ditto on unlimited access and multiple aggregators. OhioLINK has been maintaining its own platforms for years. It’s a great system when you want to make enhancements and don’t have to wait on other companies or the majority of users to agree. SP]

A View From the Top Panel at ALA

A View From the Top Panel, ALA Annual Conference

Here’s a snapshot from the ALA Presentation – A View from the Top.

Left to right:

John Barnes, Gale/Cengage, Rolf Janke, Sage, Sue Polanka, WSU, Michael Ross, Britannica, Casper Grathwohl, Oxford

To start the session, each of the panelists was asked:

Will we have reference in 10-15 years?  If so, what will it look like?

Their responses were:

John Barnes – Yes, but in a different form – digital and more interactive.  The transformation is already happening. The first step is to get our collections online, which we are doing now.  This might help to ease the “if it isn’t online it doesn’t exist” philosophy of researchers

Rolf Janke – Yes, but google and other web based vendors might share the stage with us. 5 years ago google was a threat, now they are partners.

Michael Ross  – Yes, but the vocabulary will change. We won’t have collections or series, ‘search’ will become ‘find,’ and there will be more birthing of products online.  Reference will need to become unbound – in a more transparent environment that address the needs of a variety of people.

Casper Grathwohl – We are not dying, we are knowledge factories. All of us, including Wikipedia, have a place in the environment. The information is there, we need to determine how to define it and add value to it, and there is no lack of ideas on which direction to go.