Garlow’s Blizzard of 1978 Photos

Bill Garlow was a photographer with the Dayton Journal-Herald from 1964 until the newspaper merged with the Dayton Daily News, and then continued with the DDN until his retirement, about 2006. Over his more than 40-year career, he captured hundreds of thousands of photographs of the Miami Valley’s history.

Only a fraction of the frames captured ever made it into the newspaper: any photographer sent out on assignment might take dozens of shots of an event, but there’s only so much room in the print edition of the newspaper! Well, lucky for us, Garlow kept *all* of his negatives, and in 2019, he donated them to us. The collection is open for research; learn more here: MS-665: Bill Garlow Photographic Negatives Collection.

This week, we are thrilled to share with you a handful of the photographs that Bill Garlow captured during the infamous Blizzard of ’78. We have written about the Blizzard of ’78 before, and you can also learn more from the National Weather Service at Wilmington. But as they say, a picture is worth a thousand words, so this post is mostly pictures! (And this is far from all of Garlow’s blizzard photos – but there’s also only so much room on this blog!)

Please note: Nearly all of the negatives in the Garlow Collection arrived in envelopes with dates identified, but most did not have any further description or individual captions. Therefore, the locations of these photographs are not necessarily known. If you have information about the locations or people pictured, please leave a comment or feel free to contact us!

To enlarge one of the pictures, move mouse cursor near the upper center of the image and click.

We hope you’ve enjoyed this snowflake’s taste of the Garlow Collection and of what you can learn about the Miami Valley’s history at Wright State University Libraries’ Special Collections and Archives.

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New Digital Collection of 1923 Dayton Area Street Views

We are pleased to announce the recent digitization of the Dayton Telephone Pole Line Photographs (MS-70), which consists of 113 images of documenting the locations of telephone pole lines in Dayton and rural Montgomery County, Ohio, in March 1923.

Most of the telephone pole lines were located at major road intersections, and in the photographs, the surrounding area is typically visible. This provides a nice snapshot of how that location looked at the time, including buildings, businesses, residences, and sometimes automobiles, pedestrians, and animals.

The entire collection can be freely accessed online, anytime, through the Wright State University Campus Online Repository, at CORE Scholar: Dayton Telephone Pole Line Photographs (MS-70).

Each image is numbered and the exact location identified in the caption. All images in the online gallery have been geo-tagged with a map location. To view a map showing the locations of all images in the gallery, click on the map to the left of the page, then click on any pin to see the photo captured at that location. If you are already viewing a particular image and want to know the map location, zoom in on the map at the right-hand side of the page.

Screen shot of an image in the Dayton Telephone Pole Line Photographs gallery, indicating the location on the web page of the images' geo-tag information.
Screen shot of an image in the Dayton Telephone Pole Line Photographs gallery, indicating the location on the web page of the images’ geo-tag information.

Some of the scenes look very familiar, such as Photo No. 10, On South Brown Street, Just South of Fifth, Looking North (shown here in a mashup with a Google Maps image, under Fair Use):

South Brown Street, just south of Fifth Street, looking north, shown in Google Maps today (left) and in 1923 (right, photo ms70_02_012).
South Brown Street, just south of Fifth Street, looking north, shown in Google Maps today (left) and in 1923 (right, photo ms70_02_012).

And some of the scenes look very, very different — as one might expect from nearly 100 years of change! — such as this scene in Photo No. 80, Whipp Road, at Lebanon Pike (Far Hills Avenue), Looking West:

Whipp Road, at Lebanon Pike (Far Hills Avenue), looking west, shown in Google Maps today (top) and in 1923 (bottom, photo ms70_02_082).
Whipp Road, at Lebanon Pike (Far Hills Avenue), looking west, shown in Google Maps today (top) and in 1923 (bottom, photo ms70_02_082).

We hope you’ll enjoy looking at these images as much as we enjoyed preparing them for you!

This digital project has been produced by the University Libraries’ Special Collections & Archives, through the combined efforts of its archivists and digitization specialists, who collaborated to provide the digitization, metadata encoding, and uploading of digital content to CORE Scholar.

Please visit the Special Collections & Archives’ CORE Scholar page to browse additional digital collections. Don’t forget to check out the University Archives’ CORE Scholar page as well.

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Winter Break Hours & Closures

From Tuesday, December 21, through Thursday, December 23, we will be open by appointment only.

Special Collections & Archives will be closed from Friday, December 24, 2021, through Monday, January 3, 2022, as part of the Wright State University winter break.

We will be open again beginning on Tuesday, January 4, 2022.

For the most up-to-date listing of our closures and open hours, please check the University Libraries’ Hours calendar, and make sure to look at the marked Special Collections & Archives.

While the office may be closed, the web site, blog, and digital collections on CORE Scholar are always available.

SC&A wishes everyone a happy and safe holiday season!

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